Calories in Calories out

Submitted by Staff on June 27, 2017

Losing weight is pure math. Right, you burn more than you eat. That is the old adage and the rule of thumb for the last several decades when dealing with losing weight. The only problem is this is that it is simply not true. Of the different micronutrients your body reacts differently to protein then it does to fat than it does to carbohydrates. The fat phobia of the 80’s and early 90’s have caused the obesity epidemic to sky rocket out of control. These next several articles will focus the benefits of fat and expose the real villian in heart disease, diabetes, and obesity….. sugar and carbs.

In a lab all calories are the same. So it would serve to reason that fat would cause an individual to gain weight. Fat has a higher mg per 9 kilocalories per gram as opposed to carbs and protein which each contain 4 kilocalories per gram.  So it would make sense that eating more fat would cause a person to weight gain due to the higher density of food. The calories in calories out theory. This theory was developed by the founder and first head of the Nutrition Department at Harvard University’s school of Public Health, Frederick Stare.

Stare was noted as saying, “Calories are all alike, whether they come from beef or bourbon, from sugar or starch, or from cheese and crackers. Too many calories are just too many calories”.  Stare has recently come under great scrutiny for being cahoots with the food industry. An article in the Milwaukee journal in 1960 revealed the “gift” of $1,026,000 from General Foods to the nutritional laboratories at Harvard for research into heart disease ad obesity. Harvard and Stare also received funding from Coca Cola and the National Soft Drink Association. Stare also defended the chemical additives and preservatives in food.  When the leading authority on nutrition in the whole entire country is bought and paid for by the food industry it is not hard to understand why public opinion would follow the same path.

The problem with this theory is that all calories are not created equal. Many people tend to think that fat in your food equates to fat on your body.  Certain types of fats in your foods are actually fat burners. These types of fats speed up your metabolism.  (More information on the right types of fat in article number 2 “Give Fat a Chance”). Carbohydrates cause the production of insulin or sugar spikes. According to Mark Hyman MD, insulin is a fat fertilizer meaning that insulin blocks the fat from being metabolized and only nutrient metabolized is the carbohydrates. The insulin does not allow the fat to be burned.  This theory is called the Metabolic Theory and is based on scientific research.

Our next article will focus on the type of fats you should eat and they metabolize in your body.

Kyle Rountree, ARNP 30A Medical Spa